Current Issue

Volume 14, Number 1, Apr-Jun 2020 Pages: 17-22

The Effect of Lycopene Supplementation on Mood Status and Quality of Life in Infertile Men: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial


Mehran Nouri, M.Sc, 1, Mohammad Hossein Nasr-Esfahani, Ph.D, 2, 3, Mohammad Javad Tarrahi, Ph.D, 4, Reza Amani, Ph.D., R Nutr, 5, *,
Students’ Research Committee, School of Nutrition and Food Science, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran
Department of Reproductive Biotechnology, Reproductive Biomedicine Research Centre, Royan Institute for Biotechnology, ACECR, Isfahan, Iran
Isfahan Fertility and Infertility Center, Isfahan, Iran
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Health, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran
Department of Clinical Nutrition, School of Nutrition and Food Science, Food Security Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran
*Corresponding Address: P.O.Box: 81745-73461 Department of Clinical Nutrition School of Nutrition and Food Science Food Security Research Center Isfahan University of Medical Sciences Isfahan Iran Email:r_amani@nutr.mui.ac.ir

Abstract

Background

Infertility is a major worldwide problem which is caused by several factors such as environmental, physiological, and genetic conditions. Lycopene is considered to be one of the most important antioxidants that can contribute to reducing or preventing the psychological damage that leads to infertility. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of lycopene supplementation on depression, anxiety and stress scales and quality of life in infertile men.

Materials and Methods

In this randomized clinical trial, 44 infertile men with oligozoospermia were randomly divided into the following two groups: the experimental group was supplemented with 25 mg lycopene, once per day for 12 weeks, and the control group received a placebo, for 12 weeks. Anthropometric and dietary data, physical activity, mood status, including depression, anxiety, stress, and quality of life scores were recorded pre- and post-intervention. Depression, anxiety and stress were assessed using a 21-item questionnaire (DASS-21) and quality of life was examined using the WHO 26-qustion questionnaire (WHOQOL).

Results

The baseline age and body mass index (BMI) were not significantly different between the two groups (age: 31.89 ± 2.51 and 32.15 ± 2.16 years old for intervention and placebo, respectively; P=0.732 and BMI: 27.20 ± 1.68 and 26.53 ± 1.53; for intervention and placebo, respectively; P=0.206). There were no significant differences in depression, anxiety and stress values between the two groups; however, depression score significantly decreased in both groups compared to the baseline levels (P=0.028 and P=0.031). No significant differences were observed in four domains of quality of life, except for psychological domain that was improved in the lycopene group compared to the baseline values (P=0.049).

Conclusion

Short term supplementation of lycopene had no effect on mood status and quality of life, except for psychological status in infertile men (Registration number: IRCT20171105037249N1).