Past Issue

Volume 9, Supplement 1, Summer 2015 (Presented at 16th Congress on Reproductive Biomedicine and 10th Royan Nursing and Midwifery Seminar) Pages: 98-98

P-132: Analysis of Genetic Variation of Interleukin 1-α in Idiopathic Male Infertility


Background
Despite enormous progress in the understanding of human reproductive physiology, the underlying cause of male infertility remains undefined in about 50.0% of cases, which are referred to as idiopathic infertility and already affects about 5.0-7.0% of the general male population. Interlukin- 1 is a regulator that plays an important role in maintaining a safe environment for testes and differentiation during spermatogenesis. IL-1α is expressed in all stages of the epithelial cycle of the seminiferous epithelium and applies its biological effects through pairing with its receptor on both sertoli and germ cells. It also affects spermatogenesis and cellular integrity of germ cells. The primary cellular goal of IL-1α is to maintain the binding of stertoli cell actin cytoskeleton. The gene encoding interleukin-1α has several polymorphism sites and our aim in this study is to assess the IL -889C/T polymorphic loci in men with idiopathic infertility.
Materials and methods
Blood samples were collected from 80 patients diagnosed with idiopathic male infertility and 90 control subjects and genotyped by Multiplex-PCR. To estimate the association between genotype and allele frequencies in cases and controls, P values were assessed by chisquare (X2) analysis.
Results
Among cases, the distribution of genotypes was as follows: 73 % was CT , 20 % was CC , and 7 % was TT . Among controls, 76 % was CT , 15 % was CC , and 9 % was TT .There was no significant differences in the IL-1α -889C/T genotypes and allele frequencies between infertile cases and controls.
Conclusion
IL-1α -889C/T polymorphism appeared to be unrelated to the risk of idiopathic male infertility in our population. While the results which have been done will be change if the gene pool of populations be varied. Further studies are needed to confirm the results.