Past Issue

Volume 9, Supplement 1, Summer 2015 (Presented at 16th Congress on Reproductive Biomedicine and 10th Royan Nursing and Midwifery Seminar) Pages: 61-62

P-43: Micronutrients and Sperm DNA Quality in Older Men


Background
Recent systematic reviews of the effects of micronutrients on male fertility have identified clear positive effects on basic sperm characteristics. The vast majority of Recent systematic reviews of the effects of micronutrients on male fertility have identified clear positive effects on basic sperm characteristics. The vast majority of studies reviewd found that micronutrients, particularly those that are antioxidants or aid their function, significantly reduce sperm oxidative stress or DNA damage in subfertile males but greater evidence is reguired to clearly state whether these improvements translate to improved fertility . To investigate whether lifestyle factors such as increased dietary intake of micronutrients reduce the risks of sperm DNA damage, and whether older men benefit more younger men.
Materials and methods
This is a review article.
Results
Sociodemographics, occupational exposures , medical and reproductive histories , and lifestyle habits were determined . The average daily dietary and supplement intake of micronutrients (vitamin C, vitamin E , b-carotene, zinc and folate) was determined .Men with the highest intake of vitmin C had approximately 16% less sperm DNA damage (alkaline sperm comet ) than men with the lowest intake , with similar findings for vitamin E , folate , and zinc (but not β-carotene).Older men (>44years) with the highest vitamin C intake had approximately 20% less sperm DNA damage compared with older men with the lowest intake , with similar findings for vitamin E and zinc . The older man with the highest intake of these micronutrients showed levels of sperm damage that were similar to those of the younger men. However , younger men (<44years) did not benefit from higher intakes of the micronutrients surveyed.
Conclusion
Men with higher dietary and supplement intake of certain micronutrients may produce sperm with less DNA damage ,especially among older men. This raises the broader question of how lifestyle factors, including higher intakes of antioxidants and micronutrients , might protect somatic as well as germ cells against age-associated genomic damage. Human sperm alkaline and neutral comet assay , vitamin C, vitamin E, β-carotene, zinc, folate.